NG Weekend Show #1247 - Air Date: November 18

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson as we climb El Capitan with an all-disabled team, pretend not to see leopards in South Africa, examine violence as a result of heat in East Africa, set a world record racing a cheetah, go island-hopping in the South Pacific, track local food and march across London, drink yak's blood in Nepal, and fight modern-day slavery in the United States and abroad.

HOUR 1

  • For many, the activities they do become part of who they are. Craig DeMartino discovered that being a climber was part of his identity after a belay miscommunication led to a fall that ultimately caused him to lose his leg. After questioning his desire to continue to climb, he returned to the sport that had once defined him. He was joined by two friends who are each missing a limb, and together, as The Gimp Monkeys, they became the first all-disabled team to climb El Capitan.
  • Leopards are the libertarians of the cat family. They just want to be left alone, to be interfered with as little as possible. On a trip to South Africa's Londolozi Game Reserve, Boyd met cat tracker Helen Young. Her best tips for surviving a surprise encounter with a leopard? Pretend you don't see it, and never run away.
  • It's a well-documented phenomenon that when an American thermometer's mercury climbs, the crime rate starts to increase. National Geographic grantee John O'Loughlin finds that the same holds true in East Africa. But he tells Boyd that different factors contribute to the violence, including lack of water and resource insecurity.
  • Cheetahs hold the title of the world's fastest land animal, and National Geographic recently caught one female's world-record sprint on video. Sarah, an 11-year-old cheetah at the Cincinnati Zoo, was clocked moving as fast as 61 miles per hour, covering 100 meters in 5.95 seconds. Director Greg Wilson and National Geographic editor Kim Hubbard collaborated on documenting the feat. Greg tells Boyd that the trickiest part was building a camera that could accelerate as fast as the cat, and anticipating its bursts of energy. Here's the video that shows how difficult it can be shooting a cheetah at full speed.
  • David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, tells Boyd that if we don't get enough sleep, our brains will shut down while we're still awake. The story appears in his new book, National Geographic Tales of the Weird: Unbelievable True Stories.

HOUR 2

  • Someone who has been "credited with discovering more species than Charles Darwin," has obviously spent a lot of time in the field doing research in the South Pacific. The tiny islands off the coast of Papua New Guinea are remote enough to discourage anyone but the most intrepid scientists. And Tim Flannery, author of Among the Islands: Adventures in the Pacific, is most definitely daring. He tells Boyd about diving into a 20-foot pile of bat poop to possibly discover a new species and being welcomed among tribes that were fabled to kill outsiders.
  • As a guerilla geographer, National Geographic Emerging Explorer Daniel Raven-Ellison has worn his way through several pairs of shoes in the name of education. He tells Boyd about his upcoming project: walking from the heart of London, through the city, and well past the areas considered to be London. His walk will cover 300 miles and include areas that contribute to the city in terms of food production and human labor. He explores these concepts in the book Mission: Explore Food, which aims to help children understand where their food comes from.
  • Even when summer parties get out of control at colleges around the United States, they rarely include drinking blood from a live animal. But that's just what happens at summer festivals in Nepal's Mustang region. Villagers tap yaks for their blood, and Jana Asenbrennerova joined in the festivities. She had just a sip of the blood before passing the cup on to another reveler.
  • It may be shocking to many Americans that the Civil War did not, in fact, totally stamp out human slavery in the United States. Photographer and human trafficking activist Lisa Kristine went to many places to see humans forced into various types of labor under the threat of violence. She tells Boyd about sex trafficking in Asia and the United States, as well as fishermen in Ghana's Lake Volta.
  • In this week's Wild Chronicles segment, Boyd shares his pain from a recent rotator cuff surgery. He recognizes that being an anesthesiologist is a career that requires on-the-job training, but he doesn't want to be the guinea pig.

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Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1247 - Air Date: November 18, 2012

  • 00:11:00 Craig DeMartino

    For many, the activities they do become part of who they are. Craig DeMartino discovered that being a climber was part of his identity after a belay miscommunication led to a fall that ultimately caused him to lose his leg. After questioning his desire to continue to climb, he returned to the sport that had once defined him. He was joined by two friends who are each missing a limb, and together, as The Gimp Monkeys, they became the first all-disabled team to climb El Capitan.

  • 00:09:00 Helen Young

    Leopards are the libertarians of the cat family. They just want to be left alone, to be interfered with as little as possible. On a trip to South Africa's Londolozi Game Reserve, Boyd met cat tracker Helen Young. Her best tips for surviving a surprise encounter with a leopard? Pretend you don't see it, and never run away.

  • 00:06:00 John O'Loughlin

    It's a well-documented phenomenon that when an American thermometer's mercury climbs, the crime rate starts to increase. National Geographic grantee John O'Loughlin finds that the same holds true in East Africa. But he tells Boyd that different factors contribute to the violence, including lack of water and resource insecurity.

  • Cheetahs hold the title of the world's fastest land animal, and National Geographic recently caught one female's world-record sprint on video. Sarah, an 11-year-old cheetah at the Cincinnati Zoo, was clocked moving as fast as 61 miles per hour, covering 100 meters in 5.95 seconds. Director Greg Wilson and National Geographic editor Kim Hubbard collaborated on documenting the feat. Greg tells Boyd that the trickiest part was building a camera that could accelerate as fast as the cat, and anticipating its bursts of energy.

  • David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, tells Boyd that if we don't get enough sleep, our brains will shut down while we're still awake. The story appears in his new book, National Geographic Tales of the Weird: Unbelievable True Stories.

  • 00:11:00 Tim Flannery

    Someone who has been "credited with discovering more species than Charles Darwin," has obviously spent a lot of time in the field doing research in the South Pacific. The tiny islands off the coast of Papua New Guinea are remote enough to discourage anyone but the most intrepid scientists. And Tim Flannery, author of Among the Islands: Adventures in the Pacific, is most definitely daring. He tells Boyd about diving into a 20-foot pile of bat poop to possibly discover a new species and being welcomed among tribes that were fabled to kill outsiders.

  • As a guerilla geographer, National Geographic Emerging Explorer Daniel Raven-Ellison has worn his way through several pairs of shoes in the name of education. He tells Boyd about his upcoming project: walking from the heart of London, through the city, and well past the areas considered to be London. His walk will cover 300 miles and include areas that contribute to the city in terms of food production and human labor. He explores these concepts in the book Mission: Explore Food, which aims to help children understand where their food comes from.

  • Even when summer parties get out of control at colleges around the United States, they rarely include drinking blood from a live animal. But that's just what happens at summer festivals in Nepal's Mustang region. Villagers tap yaks for their blood, and Jana Asenbrennerova joined in the festivities. She had just a sip of the blood before passing the cup on to another reveler.

  • 00:08:00 Lisa Kristine

    It may be shocking to many Americans that the Civil War did not, in fact, totally stamp out human slavery in the United States. Photographer and human trafficking activist Lisa Kristine went to many places to see humans forced into various types of labor under the threat of violence. She tells Boyd about sex trafficking in Asia and the United States, as well as fishermen in Ghana's Lake Volta.

  • In this week's Wild Chronicles segment, Boyd shares his pain from a recent rotator cuff surgery. He recognizes that being an anesthesiologist is a career that requires on-the-job training, but he doesn't want to be the guinea pig.