Archives

Episode 1226—Air Date: June 24, 2012

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson as we fight polar bears, complete a first ascent of K2's cousin, rediscover ancient medical cures, navigate complicated social quirks from every culture—instantly, cave dive with poisonous water snakes, heal with Cambodian survivors from the Killing Fields, update your summer survival gear, and walk alongside a fish on land.

Please reference National Geographic's local listings to find out the best way for you to listen to the show. National Geographic Weekend is also available on SiriusXM satellite radio, as well as iTunes podcast.

HOUR 1

*In the middle of the night on her 85 day trip kite skiing along Canada's Northwest Passage, polar explorer Sarah McNair Landry got a rude wake up call. A curious—or hungry—polar bear decided to peel open her tent and see what was inside. Sarah and her brother Eric convinced the polar bear they weren't palatable. Luckily for the bear, Sarah gave him a warning shot from her shotgun.

*Climbing wisdom tells us that summiting a mountain is a two-way trip; a safe return to base camp is just as important as achieving the summit. In their combined 80 years of mountain climbing, Mark Richey and his partner Steve Swenson have learned this as well as anyone. But what started as a routine cold left Swenson in a dangerous position on Saser Kangri II when they were completing a first ascent of the mountain. The climb is documented in their film The Old Breed.

*As our understanding of the world around us has improved, so has our medicine. But Smithsonian Institute's Alain Touwaide says there is a lot of medical value in Hippocrates' cures of broccoli, garlic, and (Touwaide's own addition) the odd glass of wine.

*In Turkey, what side of the road do you drive on? In Brazil, how much do you tip a waiter? How do you trade introductions with business partners in China? Dean Foster has the answer to these questions in his Culture Guide Apps. He gave Boyd a few tips in international courtesy, including how to properly blow your nose in Thailand.

*David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, tells Boyd that our heads have grown. David isn't talking about our egos - our cranial cavity is as much as a tennis ball bigger than just a couple hundred years ago.

HOUR 2

*Kenny Broad is technically an environmental anthropologist. So it's just a matter of circumstance that he regularly finds himself diving off the coast of Eleuthera, exploring underwater caves and playing with poisonous snakes. He tells Boyd about how he had to throw away a diving glove because he lost a fang from a sea snake inside of it.

*Under the Khmer Rouge's three year reign of terror over the country, religion was banned, thousands of Buddhist monks were forced to defrock and as many as two million Cambodians died. Cristina Trenas and her Khmer Experiment project speaks to the survivors of the regime to preserve its grim legacy for future generations to remember. She tells Boyd that today, Buddhism survived the regime and continues to hold a very important place in Cambodian culture.

*National Geographic Weekend gear guru Steve Casimiro returns to the show to help Boyd pick out the best hiking pack, the most comfortable waterproof sleeping bag, and a durable bicycle that is off the chain.

*Long before man walked on the moon, dove to the bottom of the ocean and climbed the highest mountains, one of our ancestors had to pioneer an unfamiliar land, in an achievement that ranks among the most important in history. But the Academy of Natural Science's Ted Daeschler says that there never was a first fish to walk on land—this slowly happened over millions of years of evolution.

*In this week's Wild Chronicles segment, Boyd recounts his own experiences cave scuba diving and hard-earned tips on how to find your way out of the underwater caves.

Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1226—Air Date: June 24, 2012

  • In the middle of the night on her 85 day trip kite skiing along Canada's Northwest Passage, polar explorer Sarah McNair Landry got a rude wake up call. A curious - or hungry - polar bear decided to peel open her tent and see what was inside. Sarah and her brother Eric convinced the polar bear they weren't palatable. Luckily for the bear, Sarah gave him a warning shot from her shotgun.

  • 00:09:00 Mark Richey

    Climbing wisdom tells us that summiting a mountain is a two-way trip; a safe return to base camp is just as important as achieving the summit. In their combined 80 years of mountain climbing, Mark Richey and his partner Steve Swenson have learned this as well as anyone. But what started as a routine cold left Swenson in a dangerous position on Saser Kangri II when they were completing a first ascent of the mountain. The climb is documented in their film "The Old Breed".

  • 00:06:00 Alain Touwaide

    As our understanding of the world around us has improved, so has our medicine. But Smithsonian Institute's Alain Touwaide says there is a lot of medical value in Hippocrates' cures of broccoli, garlic, and (Touwaide's own addition) the odd glass of wine.

  • 00:08:00 Dean Foster

    In Turkey, what side of the road do you drive on? In Brazil, how much do you tip a waiter? How do you trade introductions with business partners in China? Dean Foster has the answer to these questions in his Culture Guide Apps. He gave Boyd a few tips in international courtesy, including how to properly blow your nose in Thailand.

  • 00:03:50 News - June 24

    David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, tells Boyd that our heads have grown. David isn't talking about our egos - our cranial cavity is as much as a tennis ball bigger than just a couple hundred years ago.

  • 00:11:00 Kenny Broad

    Kenny Broad is technically an environmental anthropologist. So it's just a matter of circumstance that he regularly finds himself diving off the coast of Eleuthera, exploring underwater caves and playing with poisonous snakes. He tells Boyd about  how he had to throw away a diving glove because he lost a fang from a sea snake inside of it.

  • 00:09:00 Cristina Trenas

    Under the Khmer Rouge's three year reign of terror over the country, religion was banned, thousands of Buddhist monks were forced to defrock and as many as two million Cambodians died. Cristina Trenas and her Khmer Experiment project speaks to the survivors of the regime to preserve its grim legacy for future generations to remember. She tells Boyd that today, Buddhism survived the regime and continues to hold a very important place in Cambodian culture.

  • National Geographic Weekend gear guru Steve Casimiro returns to the show to help Boyd pick out the best hiking pack, the most comfortable waterproof sleeping bag, and a durable bicycle that is off the chain.

  • 00:08:00 Ted Daeschler

    Long before man walked on the moon, dove to the bottom of the ocean and climbed the highest mountains, one of our ancestors had to pioneer an unfamiliar land, in an achievement that ranks among the most important in history. But the Academy of Natural Science's Ted Daeschler says that there never was a first fish to walk on land -  this slowly happened over millions of years of evolution.

  • In this week's Wild Chronicles segment, Boyd recounts his own experiences cave scuba diving and hard-earned tips on how to find your way out of the underwater caves.