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Episode 1225—Air Date: June 17, 2012

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson as we guide injured veterans up the world's tallest peaks, revisit war-torn regions, save the world's frogs, create live maps of conflict and disaster zones, relive one of the United States' bloodiest battles, use one invasive species to combat another, celebrate the Arab Peninsula's contributions to science, and discover Yemen's weird critters.

Please reference National Geographic's local listings to find out the best way for you to listen to the show. National Geographic Weekend is also available on SiriusXM satellite radio, as well as iTunes podcast.

HOUR 1

• Some people show their appreciation for America's soldiers through bumper stickers or donating money to various charities. Tim Medvetz donates his time. Through his organization, The Heroes Project, Medvetz guides injured American soldiers up the world's tallest peaks. His treks have brought soldiers to summit Mount McKinley and Mount Kilimanjaro.

• Imagine Joseph Conrad's horror if Charles Marlow were able to take an afternoon drive down a four-lane highway, rather than a harrowing riverboat ride up the Congo River portrayed in Heart of Darkness. This type of development is constantly changing the most remote places in the world, including Vietnam, Indonesia, and Brazil, rendering them nearly unrecognizable to those who have visited years ago. Eugene Linden revisits many wild, dangerous places he once knew in his new book, The Ragged Edge of the World.

• Up to 30 percent of the world's 6,400 species of frogs find themselves in danger after a widespread fungus has been attacking various species. The real mystery: The fungus quickly kills some populations of frog, while leaving others infected, but unharmed. National Geographic grantee Anna Savage is trying to solve the mystery and save the frogs.

• When war and natural disasters strike regions, people need swift assistance to avoid further devastation. Crisis mapper and 2012 National Geographic Emerging Explorer Patrick Meier has a solution: Communicate by Twitter and text message with those on the ground in need and map the problems on their behalf, so those providing help can best target their resources.

David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, reveals to Boyd that humans aren't the only animals who use "baby talk" with their offspring.

HOUR 2

• Before modern technology allowed armies to target their enemies so closely, the harsh realities of war were much harsher. More people died in the Battle of Shiloh, the Civil War's sixth bloodiest battle, than the War of 1812 and the Spanish-American War combined. Winston Groom details the 36-hour-long battle in his new book, Shiloh, 1862.

• What's worse than introducing one invasive species to a delicate ecosystem? Introducing two invasive species. But that's just what David Burney did in his role as director of conservation at Hawaii's National Tropical Botanical Garden. Burney brought in giant tortoises to eat weeds that are choking out the native species in his gardens. He says that tortoises don't like to eat the native species—just their fruit—which helps spread their seeds elsewhere in the garden.

• n Western schools, many world history classes gloss over the period of time following the fall of the Roman Empire by calling them the Dark Ages. But Salim Al-Hassani explains to Boyd that the Muslim world was bursting with industry and discoveries that helped Europe usher in its Renaissance period. Al-Hassani edited the book 1001 Inventions: The Enduring Legacy of Muslim Civilization.

• Socotra, a remote island off the coast of Yemen, is home to some strange animals. It has been isolated from other landmasses for 18 million years. In its isolation, over 1,000 species of plants and animals evolved that do not exist anywhere else on Earth. Boyd chats with Mel White, author of "Where the Weird Things Are," in the June 2012 issue of National Geographic magazine.

• In this week's Wild Chronicles segment, Boyd has many questions about persistently misplaced luggage—and hopes the airline industry has answers.

Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1225—Air Date: June 17, 2012

  • 00:11:00 Tim Medvetz

    Some people show their appreciation for America's soldiers through bumper stickers or donating money to various charities. Tim Medvetz donates his time. Through his organization, The Heroes Project, Medvetz guides injured American soldiers up the world's tallest peaks. His treks have brought soldiers to summit Mt. McKinley and Mt. Kilimanjaro.

  • 00:09:00 Eugene Linden

    Imagine Joseph Conrad's horror if Charles Marlow were able to take an afternoon drive down a four lane highway highway, rather than a harrowing riverboat ride up the Congo River portrayed in Heart of Darkness. This type of development is constantly changing the most remote places in the world, rendering them nearly unrecognizable to those who have visited years ago. Eugene Linden revisits many wild, dangerous places he once knew, including Vietnam, Indonesia and Brazil, in his new book, The Ragged Edge of the World.

  • 00:06:00 Anna Savage

    Up to 30 percenty of the world's 6,400 species of frogs find themselves in danger after a widespread fungus has been attacking various species. The real mystery: the fungus quickly kills some populations of frog, while leaving others infected, but unharmed. National Geographic grantee Anna Savage is trying to solve the mystery and save the frogs.

  • 00:08:00 Patrick Meier

    When war and natural disasters strike regions, people need swift assistance to avoid further devastation. Crisis mapper and 2012 National Geographic Emerging Explorer Patrick Meier has a solution - communicate by Twitter and text message with those on the ground in need and map the problems on their behalf, so those providing help can best target their resources.

  • 00:03:50 News - June 17

    David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, tells Boyd that humans aren't the only animals who use "baby talk" with their offspring.

  • 00:11:00 Winston Groom

    Before modern technology allowed armies to target their enemies so closely, the harsh realities of war were much harsher. More people died in the Battle of Shiloh, the Civil War's sixth bloodiest battle, than the War of 1812 and the Spanish-American War combined. Winston Groom details the 36 hour long battle in his new book, Shiloh, 1862.

  • 00:09:00 David Burney

    What's worse than introducing one invasive species to a delicate ecosystem? Introducing two invasive species. But that's just what David Burney did in his role as Director of Conservation at Hawai'i's National Tropical Botanical Garden. Burney brought in giant tortoises to eat weeds that are choking out the native species in his gardens. He says that tortoises don't like to eat the native species - just their fruit - which helps spread their seeds elsewhere in the garden.

  • 00:06:00 Salim Al-Hassani

    In Western schools, many world history classes gloss over the period of time following the fall of the Roman Empire by calling them the "Dark Ages." But Salim Al-Hassani explains to Boyd that the Muslim world was bursting with industry and discoveries that helped the Europe usher in its Renaissance period. Al-Hassani edited the book 1001 Inventions: The Enduring Legacy of Muslim Civilization.

  • 00:08:00 Mel White

    Socotra, a remote island off the coast of Yemen, is home to some strange animals. It has been isolated fro other landmasses for 18 million years. In its isolation, over 1,000 species of plant and animals evolved that do not exist anywhere else on earth. Boyd chats with Mel White, author of "Where the Weird Things Are," in the June 2012 issue of National Geographic magazine.

  • In this week's Wild Chronicles segment, Boyd has many questions about persistently misplaced luggage - and hopes the airline industry has answers.