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Episode 1223—Air Date: June 3, 2012

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson as we survive K2's deadliest day, give the presidential candidates a psychopath test, excavate Jordan's less famous abodes, paddle down the Mississippi River during a flood, snack on bush meat, map Cuba for the first time in a century, meet man's newest three-million-year-old cousin, and dodge bullets while painting a picture.

Please reference National Geographic's local listings to find out the best way for you to listen to the show. National Geographic Weekend is also available on SiriusXM satellite radio, as well as iTunes podcast.

HOUR 1

• In the midst of a tricky K2 climbing season fraught with setbacks and traffic jams on the summit, Amanda Padoan quietly reflects on the last year that gave climbers serious problems. In August 2008, eleven climbers died on the mountain. Chhiring Dorje Sherpa and Pasang Lama survived with the help of a near miracle climb down the mountain. Padoan shares the story with Boyd, which she has written in Buried in the Sky: The Extraordinary Story of the Sherpa Climbers on K2's Deadliest Day with co-author Peter Zuckerman.

Jon Ronson is an admitted hypochondriac. It's not surprising that his newest project, finding psychopaths who live among us, nearly drove him crazy. He met CEOs who described their psychopathic tendencies as "good business practices," and at Boyd's encouragement, gave a non-political analysis of the two most likely presidential candidates: Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. His new book is called The Psychopath Test: A Journey Through the Madness Industry.

• Everybody knows about Petra, Jordan's magnificent tombs and monasteries (which, as National Geographic grantee Tom Parker notes, were home to the Holy Grail in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade). He tells Boyd that he hasn't yet found the Grail, but is busy excavating the homes and graves of more average residents of Petra.

• When Brett Rogers made his boat to row down the Mississippi River from near the source in Bemidji, Minnesota, to the Gulf of Mexico, he underestimated the importance of the boat's weight. His 1,000-pound rowboat was difficult to portage—he and his four person crew ran into many other difficulties along the trip, including rain, floods, and bad tempers. He has edited his video footage into The Old Man River Project web television show.

David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, explains to Boyd just how close asteroid 2012 DA14 will come to Earth. It won't hit our planet, but may take out a satellite.

HOUR 2

• Many meats are said to taste like chicken. One of the few people qualified to approximate the flavors of the many animals that run around Madagascar's jungles is National Geographic grantee Chris Golden. His tips: flying fox is delicious; lemur eyeballs are not. Also, don't eat endangered animals.

Juan Valdes grew up in Cuba, where learning the world from maps was something of an escape. He carried that passion all through his life growing up in the United States, and is now National Geographic's Maps Director of Editorial and Research. Valdes was the driving force behind National Geographic's first updated map of Cuba in over a century. He tells Boyd that, after recently returning from a trip of his native country, the changes since his last visit a decade ago were surprising.

• Lucy, the 3.2-million-year-old Australopithecus afarensis skeleton, has a new cousin recently added to her family tree. Donald Johanson, Lucy's discoverer, explains to Boyd that the newest member of humanity's family has a big toe that is better adapted to climbing trees, rather than walking on two legs, like Lucy.

• War coverage has come a long way in the past century. Before cameras were portable and broadcast television and radio brought the conflicts into our living rooms, sketch artists were the public's eyes into wars. Harry Katz, author of National Geographic magazine's May article "Civil War Battlefield Art," tells Boyd about the dangers of being a sketch artist during the United States' Civil War.

• In this week's Wild Chronicles segment, Boyd discusses his recent visit to Florence, Italy, where he visited the possible location of "The Battle of Anghiari," Leonardo da Vinci's missing masterpiece.

Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1223—Air Date: June 3, 2012

  • 00:11:00 Amanda Padoan

    In the midst of a tricky Everest climbing season fraught with setbacks and traffic jams on the summit, Amanda Padoan quietly reflects on the last year that gave climbers serious problems. In August 2008, eleven climbers died on the mountain. Chhiring Dorje Sherpa and Pasang Lama survived with the help of a near miracle climb down the mountain. Padoan shares the story with Boyd, which she has written in Buried in the Sky: The Extraordinary Story of the Sherpa Climbers on K2's Deadliest Day with co-author, Peter Zuckerman.

  • 00:09:00 Jon Ronson

    Jon Ronson is an admitted hypochondriac. It's not surprising that his newest project, finding psychopaths who live among us, nearly drove him crazy. He met CEO's who described their psychopathic tendencies as "good business practices," and at Boyd's encouragement, gave a non-political analysis of the two most likely Presidential candidates: Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. His new book is called The Psychopath Test: A Journey Through the Madness Industry.

  • 00:06:00 Tom Parker

    Everybody knows about Petra, Jordan's magnificent tombs and monasteries (which, as National Geographic grantee Tom Parker notes, were home to the Holy Grail in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.) He tells Boyd that he hasn't yet found the Grail, but is busy excavating the homes and graves of more average residents of Petra.

  • 00:08:00 Brett Rogers

    When Brett Rogers made his boat to row down the Mississippi River from near the source in Bemidji, Minn. to the Gulf of Mexico, he underestimated the importance of the boat's weight. His 1,000 pound rowboat was difficult to portage -- he and his four person crew ran into many other difficulties along the trip, including rain, floods and bad tempers. He has edited his video footage into The Old Man River Project web television show.

  • 00:03:50 News - June 3

    David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, explains to Boyd just how close asteroid 2012 DA14 will come to earth. It won't hit our planet, but may take out a satellite.

  • 00:11:00 Chris Golden

    Many meats are said to taste like chicken. One of the few people qualified to approximate the flavors of the many animals that run around Madagascar's jungles is National Geographic grantee Chris Golden. His tips: flying fox is delicious; lemur eyeballs are not. Also, don't eat endangered animals.

  • 00:09:00 Juan Valdes

    Juan Valdes grew up in Cuba, where learning the world from maps was something of an escape. He carried that passion all through his life growing up in the United States, and is now National Geographic's Maps Director of Editorial and Research. Valdes was the driving force behind National Geographic's first updated map of Cuba in over a century. He tells Boyd that, after recently returning from a trip of his native country, said that the changes since his last visit a decade ago were surprising.

  • 00:06:00 Donald Johanson

    Lucy, the 3.2 million year old Australopithecus afarensis skeleton, has a new cousin recently added to her family tree. Donald Johanson, Lucy's discoverer, explains to Boyd that the newest member of humanity's family has a big toe that is better adapted to climbing trees, rather than walking on two legs, like Lucy.

  • 00:08:00 Harry Katz

    War coverage has come a long way in the past century. Before cameras were portable and broadcast television and radio brought the conflicts into our living rooms, sketch artists were the public's eyes into wars. Harry Katz, author of National Geographic magazine's May article "Civil War Battlefield Art", tells Boyd about the dangers of being a sketch artist during the United States' Civil War.

  • In this week's Wild Chronicles segment, Boyd discusses his recent visit to Florence, Italy where he visited the possible location of "The Battle of Anghiari," da Vinci's missing masterpiece.