Archives

Episode 1203—Air Date: January 15, 2012

This week on National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson speaks with guests about surviving an avalanche in Pakistan, paragliding over volcanoes in Ethiopia, discovering new shark mating habits in Australia, getting robbed at gunpoint in Laos, photographing lions in East Africa, discovering new ways to see without eyesight, eating one's way through China, and migrating with whooping cranes.

HOUR 1

• National Geographic’s 2012 Adventurer of the Year, Cory Richards, documented his ascent of Pakistan’s Gasherbrum II in his documentary, Cold. What he hadn’t counted on was getting caught in an avalanche that buried his whole team. He revisits the event with Boyd, from the terror of the avalanche to discovering that his friends had also survived.

George Steinmetz soared above Africa’s Afar Depression in his January article for National Geographic magazine. He told Boyd how he felt like he was visiting Biblical times, soaring above salt-laden camel caravans in his motorized paraglider.

• Deer and elk don’t mate. Neither do horses and cows. But off Australia’s coast, two separate species of shark are mating, and may be breeding themselves out of existence. Dr. Jennifer Ovenden tells Boyd that the hybrid offspring may be hardier and better suited for survival.

Sarah Marquis is walking from Siberia to Australia. Recently, she found herself in Laos, staring down the barrel of an automatic rifle and being yelled at in a language she didn’t know. She tells Boyd about how she walked away unharmed—but with fewer possessions.

David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, joins Boyd to discuss a shark’s seemingly immaculate conception.

HOUR 2

Nick Nichols checked in from Kenya, where he is using remote imaging technology to get a new perspective on photographing lions and elephants.

• When Daniel Kish lost his sight as an infant, he quickly adapted another method of relating to the world around him. Without understanding it, he began to click his tongue in a way that allowed him to hear objects—a form of human sonar. He now helps others without sight navigate the world.

Nate Tate and his sister Mary Kate have traveled all over China, eating their way through the nation’s various cuisines. Chinese food in the United States doesn’t exactly ring as authentic, so they wrote Feeding the Dragon, a cookbook to bring China’s culinary secrets Stateside. But they omitted the recipes that included dog, which, as Nate explains, tastes like “gamey beef.”

Joe Duff is unusually dedicated in helping whooping cranes migrate. He has been living with a flock of the birds making their first winter migration from Wisconsin to Florida. They left in October but currently sit in Alabama, nearing the end of their trip.

• In the weekly Wild Chronicles segment Boyd shares his amazement when he discovered just how powerful a dolphin’s echolocation can be.

Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1203—Air Date: January 15, 2012

  • 00:11:00 Cory Richards

    National Geographic’s 2012 Adventurer of the Year, Cory Richards documented his ascent of Pakistan’s Gasherbrum II in his documentary, Cold. What he hadn’t counted on was getting caught in an avalanche that buried his whole team. He revisits that moment with Boyd, as well as those after where he discovered his friends had also survived.

  • 00:09:00 George Steinmetz

    George Steinmetz soared above Africa’s Afar Depression in his January article for National Geographic magazine. He told Boyd how it felt like visiting Biblical times, soaring above salt-laden camel caravans in his motorized paraglider.

  • 00:06:00 Jennifer Ovenden

    Deer and elk don’t mate. Neither do horses and cows. But off Australia’s coast, two separate species of shark are mating, and may be breeding themselves out of existence. Dr. Jennifer Ovenden tells Boyd that the hybrid offspring may be hardier and better suited for survival.

  • 00:08:00 Sarah Marquis

    Sarah Marquis is walking from Siberia to Australia. Recently, she found herself in Laos, staring down the barrel of an automatic rifle and being yelled at in a language she didn’t know. She tells Boyd about how she walked away unharmed – but with fewer possessions.

  • David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, joins Boyd to discuss a shark’s seemingly immaculate conception.

  • 00:11:00 Nick Nichols

    Nick Nichols checked in from Kenya, where he is using remote imaging technology to get a new perspective on photographing lions and elephants.

  • 00:09:00 Daniel Kish

    When Daniel Kish lost his sight as an infant, he quickly adapted another method of relating to the world around him. Without understanding it, he began to click his tongue in a way that allowed him to hear objects – a form of human sonar. He now helps others without sight navigate the world.

  • Nate and his sister Mary Kate Tate have traveled all over China, eating their way through the nation’s various cuisines. Chinese food in the United States doesn’t exactly ring as “authentic,” but they wrote “Feeding the Dragon,” a cookbook to bring China’s culinary secrets Stateside. But they omitted the recipes that included dog, which, as Nate explains, tastes like “gamey beef.”

  • 00:08:00 Joe Duff

    Joe Duff is unusually dedicated in helping whooping cranes migrate. He has been living with a flock of the birds making their first winter migration from Wisconsin to Florida. They left in October but currently sit in Alabama, nearing the end of their trip.

  • 00:03:50 Dolphin Sonar

    In the weekly Wild Chronicles segment Boyd shares his amazement when he discovered just how powerful a dolphin’s echolocation can be.