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Episode 1144—Air Date: October 29, 2011

This week on National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson speaks with guests about sleeping under the stars in Africa, dolphins using tools, a taste of travel, reaching 7 billion people on planet Earth, the origins of daylight savings time, searching for uncontacted tribes in the Amazon, putting Triceratops in its place, digging up dinosaur bones in Canada, sailing through a sea of plastic, and safari style tips.

HOUR 1

Geoff Calmeyer co-founded Roar Africa to give travelers a unique African experience. Calmeyer and Boyd talk about the excitement of sleeping in the bush, under the stars, surrounded by lions.

• National Geographic Young Explorer Eric Patterson studies dolphins off the west coast of Australia. Patterson and his colleagues are studying a small percentage of dolphins that use marine sponges as tools. Patterson explains to Boyd how the dolphins wear the sponges like a glove to protect their beaks.

National Geographic Traveler Senior Editor Nori Quintos joins Boyd to talk about the October 2011 issue of the magazine and the cover story “167 Real Food Experiences.” Quintos shares stories of eating everything from raw seal liver to southern comfort food.

• Can you feel the planet groaning? This weekend the world population will reach 7 billion. National Geographic magazine Creative Director Bill Marr tells Boyd about the newly released iPad app—7 Billion: How Your World Will Change—that allows users to explore the many ramifications of the population explosion.

David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, joins Boyd to talk about the origins of daylight savings time.

HOUR 2

• Author Scott Wallace, a frequent contributor to National Geographic magazine, spent three months trekking through the deepest recesses of the Amazon in search of the jungle’s last uncontacted tribes. Wallace tells Boyd about the journey and his new book The Unconquered, which chronicles the adventure.

• National Geographic Young Explorer Eric Morschhauser is digging up dirt on dinosaurs in China. Morschhauser, a University of Pennsylvania paleontologist, tells Boyd how he is trying to sort out the linage of horned dinosaurs.

Richard Wiese, host of Born to Explore on ABC, joins Boyd to talk about digging up fossils in the newest episode of the program. Twenty-six episodes of the program are scheduled to air over the next year.

• In 1997, while sailing across the Pacific Ocean, captain Charles Moore chanced across something completely unexpected: a giant swirling mass of plastic. This discovery led Moore to spend time learning about the "Great Pacific Garbage Patch." Moore has written a new book called Plastic Ocean, which chronicles his quest to save the seas.

Boyd says when on safari, wearing white after Labor Day isn’t just a fashion faux pas, it’s a life-threatening decision.

Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1144—Air Date: October 29, 2011

  • 00:11:00 Geoff Calmeyer

    Geoff Calmeyer co-founded Roar Africa to give travelers a unique African experience. Calmeyer and Boyd talk about the excitement of sleeping in the bush, under the stars, surrounded by lions.

    • 00:09:00 Eric Patterson

      National Geographic Young Explorer Eric Patterson studies dolphins off the west coast of Australia. Patterson and his colleagues are studying a small percentage of dolphins that use marine sponges as tools. Patterson explains to Boyd how the dolphins wear the sponges like a glove to protect their beaks.

    • 00:06:00 Nori Quintos

      National Geographic Traveler Senior Editor Nori Quintos joins Boyd to talk about the October 2011 issue of the magazine and the cover story "167 Real Food Experiences.” Quintos shares stories of eating everything from raw seal liver to southern comfort food.

    • 00:08:00 Bill Marr

      Can you feel the planet groaning? This weekend the world population will reach 7 billion. National Geographic magazine Creative Director Bill Marr tells Boyd about the newly released iPad app—7 Billion: How Your World Will Change—that allows users to explore the many ramifications of the population explosion.

    • David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, joins Boyd to talk about the origins of daylight savings time.

      • 00:11:00 Scott Wallace

        Author Scott Wallace, a frequent contributor to National Geographic magazine, spent three months trekking through the deepest recesses of the Amazon in search of the jungle’s last uncontacted tribes. Wallace tells Boyd about the journey and his new book The Unconquered, which chronicles the adventure.

      • National Geographic Young Explorer Eric Morschhauser is digging up dirt on dinosaurs in China. Morschhauser, a University of Pennsylvania paleontologist, tells Boyd how he is trying to sort out the linage of horned dinosaurs.

      • 00:06:00 Richard Wiese

        Richard Wiese, host of Born to Explore on ABC, joins Boyd to talk about digging up fossils in the newest episode of the program. Twenty-six episodes of the program are scheduled to air over the next year.

      • 00:08:00 Charles Moore

        In 1997, while sailing across the Pacific Ocean, Captain Charles Moore chanced across something completely unexpected: a giant swirling mass of plastic. This discovery led Moore to spend time learning about the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Moore has written a new book called Plastic Ocean, which chronicles his quest to save the seas.

      • Boyd says when on safari, wearing white after Labor Day isn’t just a fashion faux pas, it’s a life-threatening decision.