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Episode 1141—Air Date: October 8, 2011

This week on National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson speaks with guests about rescuing a lion cub from a tree, saving turtles by making turtle soup, looking through Ansel Adams’ lens, bonding with baby elephants, the Ig Noble Prizes, beer-loving beetles and life with the Beatles, tree kangaroos, a world without ice, flying monsters, and travel trouble.

HOUR 1

• Imagine opening your front door to pick up the morning paper and finding a lion. National Geographic Emerging Explorer Paula Kahumbu is the executive director of WildlifeDirect and she joins producer Ben Shaw in the studio to talk about living with lions in a residential neighborhood of Nairobi, Kenya.

Walter Mustin is the chief research officer at the Cayman Turtle Farm. Boyd visits the farm where turtle hatchlings are raised both as food and for conservation.

• Photographer Peter Essick pays tribute to Ansel Adams in the October National Geographic magazine article “The Mountains That Made the Man.” Boyd talks with Essick about replicating Adams’ style with modern photo equipment.

Edwin Lusichi is the head elephant keeper at the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust. Boyd travels to Kenya to visits with Lusichi and an elephant named Kibo. Lusichi explains why it is so difficult to raise orphaned elephants.

• This week David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, joins Boyd to talk about Australian beetles that literally love a particular brand of beer.

HOUR 2

• British fashion model Pattie Boyd was wife to, and a muse for, two of music’s greatest rock legends: George Harrison and Eric Clapton. Boyd tells the story of how she became the inspiration for Harrison’s song “Something,” and Clapton’s songs “Wonderful Tonight” and “Layla.” Boyd speaks as part of the National Geographic Live, Music on… Photography event in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 12.

Lisa Dabek is the director of the Tree Kangaroo Conservation Program based at Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle. Dabek recently traveled to Papua New Guinea with members of the National Geographic Crittercam team to fit the elusive tree kangaroo with a camera. The team was successful, and as Dabek tells Boyd, the breathtaking treetop footage is already answering many questions about the mysterious kangaroos.

• Fifty-six million years ago a mysterious surge of carbon sent global temperatures soaring. Robert Kunzig writes about this hot period in “World Without Ice” for the October issue of National Geographic magazine. Kunzig says this global warming of the past has lessons for us today.

• While digging in Texas, paleontologist Doug Lawson found a fossil of the world’s largest flying reptile. The creature he uncovered, called a pterosaur, is brought to life in the new National Geographic film Flying Monsters 3D. The film will be shown in museum theaters starting in October. Lawson tells Boyd about his find.

Boyd says while he loves to travel, sometimes the airlines can make getting to and from home an uncomfortable experience.

Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1141—Air Date: October 8, 2011

  • 00:11:00 Paula Kahumbu

    Imagine opening your front door to pick up the morning paper and finding a lion. National Geographic Emerging Explorer Paula Kahumbu is the executive director of WildlifeDirect and she joins producer Ben Shaw in the studio to talk about living with lions in a residential neighborhood of Nairobi, Kenya.

  • 00:09:00 Walter Mustin

    Walter Mustin is the chief research officer at the Cayman Turtle Farm. Boyd visits the farm where turtle hatchlings are raised both as food and for conservation.

    • 00:06:00 Peter Essick

      Photographer Peter Essick pays tribute to Ansel Adams in the October National Geographic magazine article “The Mountains That Made the Man.” Boyd talks with Essick about replicating Adams’ style with modern photo equipment.

      • 00:08:00 Edwin Lusichi

        Edwin Lusichi is the head elephant keeper at the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust. Boyd travels to Kenya to visits with Lusichi and an elephant named Kibo. Lusichi explains why it is so difficult to raise orphaned elephants.

      • This week David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, joins Boyd to talk about Australian beetles that literally love a particular brand of beer.

        • 00:11:00 Pattie Boyd

          British fashion model Pattie Boyd was wife to, and a muse for, two of music’s greatest rock legends: George Harrison and Eric Clapton. Boyd tells the story of how she became the inspiration for Harrison’s song “Something,” and Clapton’s songs “Wonderful Tonight” and “Layla.” Boyd speaks as part of the National Geographic Live, Music on… Photography event in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 12.

        • 00:09:00 Lisa Dabek

          Lisa Dabek is the director of the Tree Kangaroo Conservation Program based at Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle. Dabek recently traveled to Papua New Guinea with members of the National Geographic Crittercam team to fit the elusive tree kangaroo with a camera. The team was successful, and as Dabek tells Boyd, the breathtaking treetop footage is already answering many questions about the mysterious kangaroos.

        • 00:06:00 Robert Kunzig

          Fifty-six million years ago a mysterious surge of carbon sent global temperatures soaring. Robert Kunzig writes about this hot period in “World Without Ice” for the October issue of National Geographic magazine. Kunzig says this global warming of the past has lessons for us today.

        • 00:08:00 Doug Lawson

          While digging in Texas, paleontologist Doug Lawson found a fossil of the world’s largest flying reptile. The creature he uncovered, called a pterosaur, is brought to life in the new National Geographic film “Flying Monsters 3D.” The film will be shown in museum theaters starting in October. Lawson tells Boyd about his find.

        • Boyd says while he loves to travel, sometimes the airlines can make getting to and from home an uncomfortable experience.