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Episode 1134—Air Date: August 20, 2011

This week on National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson speaks with guests about living with lions, unlikely animal friendships, great gear for your next adventure, finding shipwrecks in Lake Huron, a sea monster with giant jaws, a medical lab on a chip, collecting trash for a year, going on an energy diet, tagging African buffalo, and the "Matson Museum of Overpriced Artifacts."

HOUR 1

• National Geographic Explorers-in-Residence Dereck and Beverly Joubert capture astounding images of African wildlife in their beautiful films. The Jouberts live in the African bush alongside the lions and other animals they profile. They explain to Boyd that, because big cats are in such danger, their work is now focused on conservation projects such as the Cause an Uproar program.

• National Geographic magazine writer Jennifer Holland has a new book called Unlikely Friendships: 47 Remarkable Stories from the Animal Kingdom. The book chronicles, in words and pictures, a number of unusual animal friendships such as those between a sheep and an elephant, a snake and a hamster, and a monkey and a dove.

Steve Casimiro, the “gear guru,” shows Boyd the latest in outdoor technology for lightweight outdoor gear, from new backpacks, to efficient camp stoves, to an easy-to-use GPS.

James Delgado is the director of maritime heritage at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). He is also the mentor for a group of high school students from Saginaw, Mich., who recently found two Lake Huron shipwrecks. Delgado tells Boyd how inspiring it was to lead the five students in Project Shiphunt.

• This week David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, tells Boyd about a newly discovered pit viper and an ancient sea monster with huge jaws.

HOUR 2

• National Geographic Emerging Explorer Hayat Sindi is using science to bring the world’s poorest people affordable health checks. Sindi tells Boyd how she is developing cheap diagnostic medical tests the size of postage stamps that could revolutionize the way medicine is practiced across the developing world.

• Cameraman Dave Chameides threw nothing away for an entire year. Instead he collected all his trash and stored it in the basement of his house. How much he collected might surprise you. Chameides talks to Boyd about the lessons learned from his yearlong experiment. Visit Dave's blog.

• National Geographic producer Christina Nunez wants you to go on a diet. But this diet is not about cutting back on carbs or eating more vegetables—it’s an energy diet. Nunez tells Boyd about the 360º Energy Diet, part of National Geographic’s Great Energy Challenge.

• Buffalo might not spring to mind when Africa’s deadliest animals are being considered. But they are very dangerous animals. And it’s Robin Naidoo’s job to capture, collar, and release the African buffalo. A World Wildlife Fund conservation scientist, Naidoo shares what it takes to study these large, dangerous mammals.

Boyd talks about his collection of odd items from around the world, or what he calls the "Matson Museum of Overpriced Artifacts."

Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1134—Air Date: August 20, 2011

  • National Geographic Explorers-in-Residence Dereck and Beverly Joubert capture astounding images of African wildlife in their beautiful films. The Jouberts live in the African bush alongside the lions and other animals they profile. They explain to Boyd that, because big cats are in such danger, their work is now focused on conservation projects such as the Cause an Uproar program.

  • 00:09:00 Jennifer Holland

    National Geographic magazine writer Jennifer Holland has a new book called Unlikely Friendships: 47 Remarkable Stories from the Animal Kingdom.The book chronicles, in words and pictures, a number of unusual animal friendships such as those between a sheep and an elephant, a snake and a hamster,

  • 00:06:00 Steve Casimiro

    Steve Casimiro, the “gear guru,” shows Boyd the latest in outdoor technology for lightweight outdoor gear, from new backpacks to efficient camp stoves to an easy-to-use GPS.

  • 00:08:00 James Delgado

    James Delgado is the director of maritime heritage at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). He is also the mentor for a group of high school students from Saginaw, Mich., who recently found two Lake Huron shipwrecks. Delgado tells Boyd how inspiring it was to lead the five students in Project Shiphunt.

  • This week David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, tells Boyd about a newly discovered pit viper and an ancient sea monster with huge jaws.

  • 00:11:00 Hayat Sindi

    National Geographic Emerging Explorer Hayat Sindi is using science to bring the world’s poorest people affordable health checks. Sindi tells Boyd how she is developing cheap diagnostic medical tests the size of postage stamps that could revolutionize the way medicine is practiced across the developing world.

  • 00:09:00 Dave Chameides

    Cameraman Dave Chameides threw nothing away for an entire year. Instead he collected all his trash and stored it in the basement of his house. How much he collected might surprise you. Chameides talks to Boyd about the lessons learned from his yearlong experiment. Visit Dave's blog.

  • National Geographic producer Christina Nunez wants you to go on a diet. But this diet is not about cutting back on carbs, or eating more vegetables—it’s an energy diet. Nunez tells Boyd about the 360º Energy Diet, part of National Geographic’s Great Energy Challenge.

  • 00:08:00 Robin Naidoo

    Buffalo might not spring to mind when Africa’s deadliest animals are being considered. But they are very dangerous animals. And it’s Robin Naidoo’s job to capture, collar and release the African buffalo. A World Wildlife Fund conservation scientist, Naidoo shares what it takes to study these large, dangerous mammals.

  • Boyd talks about his collection of odd items from around the world, or what he calls the Matson Museum of Overpriced Artifacts.