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Episode 1132—Air Date: August 5, 2011

This week on National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson speaks with guests about communicating via a banjo, unearthing dinosaur secrets, discovering new species in a new country, searching for cat scat, investigating the workings of the human brain, walking from Siberia to Australia, eating to save the environment, using the ocean to bring the world together, and making a game of playing with poop.

HOUR 1

• Many people can’t imagine remaining totally silent for a single day. National Geographic Fellow John Francis, author of the book Planet Walker, didn’t speak for 17 years. During this time he walked across the United States, using his banjo to communicate. Francis tells Boyd about his cross-country journeys on foot during these years and the challenges and discoveries that he faced along the way.

• National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Paul Sereno is digging up the dirt on dinosaurs hiding right here in North America. Sereno tells Boyd about his plans for a dig in Wyoming and talks about a special little dinosaur that holds its own secrets.

• With the birth of a new nation may come the birth of a new species, at least into our collective knowledge. National Geographic grantee DeeAnn Reeder is heading to South Sudan during this time of peace in hopes of being able to finally collect information on the vast amounts of animals there.

• National Geographic grantee Karen DeMatteo is making a science of poop. DeMatteo tells Boyd why she is collecting cat scat in South America. With the help of a dog, DeMatteo is learning about, and working to protect, jaguars, pumas, and ocelots.

• National Geographic Emerging Explorer Paula Kahumbu reports from Kenya as millions of dollars in confiscated ivory is set ablaze in a bold move by the government to send a statement of intolerance to poachers and put a stop to the illegal ivory trade.

HOUR 2

• Perhaps seeing shouldn’t always mean believing. In his new book Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain, neuroscientist and best selling author David Eagleman explains the science of perception and how what we see may not always be a perfect reality. Eagleman joins Boyd to talk about his work and his book.

• Twenty years ago, Sarah Marquis went out for a little stroll; 18,600 miles later she is still walking. Marquis walked across the Australian Outback for 17 months, often surviving on lizards she hunted herself. Marquis is currently in the midst of a trek from southern Siberia to Australia. Boyd catches up with Marquis via phone for the second time during her current adventure.

Kathleen Frith, managing director of the Center for Health and the Global Environment at Harvard Medical School, tells Boyd about how the environment around us can affect our personal health and how our personal eating habits can impact the environment. Frith share some simple rules we can follow to take care of our environment and, in turn, ourselves.

Claire Fackler, director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Oceans for Life program, talks to Boyd about using the oceans to bring people together. Fackler joins Boyd from the Channel Islands off California where she is leading a group of high school students from diverse cultures and backgrounds in discovering marine science.

Boyd talks about the many uses for poop, from important science to the centerpiece of backyard games.

Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1132—Air Date: August 5, 2011

  • 00:11:00 John Francis

    Many people can’t imagine remaining totally silent for a single day. National Geographic Fellow John Francis, author of the book Planet Walker, didn’t speak for 17 years. During this time he walked across the United States, using his banjo to communicate. Francis tells Boyd about his cross-country journeys on foot during these years and the challenges and discoveries that he faced along the way.

  • 00:09:00 Paul Sereno

    National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Paul Sereno is digging up the dirt on dinosaurs hiding right here in North America. Sereno tells Boyd about his plans for a dig in Wyoming and talks about a special little dinosaur that holds its own secrets.

  • 00:06:00 DeeAnn Reeder

    With the birth of a new nation may come the birth of a new species, at least into our collective knowledge. National Geographic grantee DeeAnn Reeder is heading to South Sudan during this time of peace in hopes of being able to finally collect information on the vast amounts of animals there.

  • 00:08:00 Karen DeMatteo

    National Geographic grantee Karen DeMatteo is making a science of poop. DeMatteo tells Boyd why she is collecting cat scat in South America. With the help of a dog, DeMatteo is learning about, and working to protect, jaguars, pumas and ocelots.

  • 00:03:50 Paula Kahumbu

    National Geographic Emerging Explorer Paula Kahumbu reports from Kenya as millions of dollars in confiscated ivory are set ablaze in a bold move by the government to send a statement of intolerance to poachers and put a stop to the illegal ivory trade.

  • 00:11:00 David Eagleman

    Perhaps seeing shouldn’t always mean believing. In his new book Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain, neuroscientist and best selling author David Eagleman explains the science of perception and how what we see may not always be a perfect reality. Eagleman joins Boyd to talk about his work and his book.

  • 00:09:00 Sarah Marquis

    Twenty years ago, Sarah Marquis went out for a little stroll; 18,600 miles later she is still walking. Marquis walked across the Australian Outback for 17 months, often surviving on lizards she hunted herself. Marquis is currently in the midst of a trek from southern Siberia to Australia. Boyd catches up with Marquis via phone for the second time during her current adventure.

  • 00:06:00 Kathleen Frith

    Kathleen Frith, managing director of the Center for Health and the Global Environment at Harvard Medical School, tells Boyd about how the environment around us can affect our personal health and how our personal eating habits can impact the environment. Frith share some simple rules we can follow to take care of our environment and, in turn, ourselves.

  • 00:08:00 Claire Fackler

    Claire Fackler, director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Oceans for Life program, talks to Boyd about using the oceans to bring people together. Fackler joins Boyd from the Channel Islands off California where she is leading a group of high school students from diverse cultures and backgrounds in discovering marine science.

  • Boyd talks about the many uses for poop, from important science to the centerpiece of backyard games.