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Episode 1126—Air Date: June 25, 2011

This week on National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson speaks with guests about filming tigers in India, the secrets to a long and happy life, blowing the tops off mountains, an app for identifying trees, penguins doing the wave, surviving a plane crash and finding yourself surrounded by cannibalistic headhunters, forgiving those who have hurt you the most, the clever camouflage of cuttlefish, super parks in Africa, and jet-skiing.

HOUR 1

• Filmmaker Sandesh Kadur considers himself lucky. But he’s also patient. He spent a week hanging out next to a rotting rhinoceros carcass in order to capture tigers in Kaziranga National Park for his film Kaziranga: Land of the Rhino. As Kadur tells Boyd, it paid off in the end.

• Ten years ago, National Geographic author Dan Buettner identified the places in the world where people live the longest. He called the regions "Blue Zones.” Now he has found a hotspot of longevity where, on average, men live longer than anywhere else on Earth. Buettner joins Boyd to share the secrets of this small village in Sardinia.

• National Geographic Young Explorer Josh Howard is documenting the destruction happening in his own backyard in Kentucky and West Virginia. Howard recently embarked on a 12-month photographic study of mountaintop removal coal mining in Appalachia. He has also created a documentary film on the subject.

• Are you still wondering what kind of tree that is in your back yard? Now a click of your smart phone can tell you. Smithsonian research botanist John Kress, together with engineers at Columbia University, has developed the Leafsnap app—an electronic field guide. Take a photo of a leaf, and the app can tell you what tree it comes from. Kress joins Boyd in the National Geographic courtyard to identify some trees.

• This week David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, joins Boyd to talk about penguins in Antarctica doing the wave.

HOUR 2

• Set in 1945, Lost in Shangri-La is a book about three people who survive a plane crash in a remote region of Dutch New Guinea only to realize they are surrounded by man-eating headhunters and enemy Japanese soldiers. This amazing, true story of survival is told by author Mitchell Zuckoff, who joins Boyd to talk about his new book.

• National Geographic Young Explorer Natalia Ledford is trying to understand how Rwandan orphans are able to forgive those who killed their families during the genocide that occurred in that country. Ledford and co-director Emmanuel Habimana, a Rwandan orphan himself, are working on completing a film about this.

• National Geographic grantee Roger Hanlon is showing that cuttlefish may be better impersonators than Rich Little. Hanlon’s studies show cuttlefish are able to shape-shift in order to mimic their surroundings in nature and in an aquarium.

• Namibia is one of the first countries to write environmental protection into its constitution. Now, nearly half of the African country’s landmass is devoted to national parks. Alexandra Fuller, author of the July National Geographic magazine article “Africa’s Super Park,” joins Boyd to talk about the article.

• While he is not a regular jet-ski user, Boyd explains why he recently made an exception.

Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1126—Air Date: June 25, 2011

  • While he is not a regular jet-ski user, Boyd explains why he recently made an exception.

  • 00:11:00 Sandesh Kadur

    Filmmaker Sandesh Kadur considers himself lucky. But he’s also patient. He spent a week hanging out next to a rotting rhinoceros carcass in order to capture tigers in Kaziranga National Park for his film Kaziranga: Land of the Rhino. As Kadur tells Boyd, it paid off in the end.

  • 00:09:00 Dan Buettner

    Ten years ago, National Geographic author Dan Buettner identified the places in the world where people live the longest. He called the regions “Blue Zones.” Now he has found a hotspot of longevity where, on average, men live longer than anywhere else on Earth. Buettner joins Boyd to share the secrets of this small village in Sardinia.

  • 00:06:00 Josh Howard

    National Geographic Young Explorer Josh Howard is documenting the destruction happening in his own backyard in Kentucky and West Virginia. Howard recently embarked on a 12-month photographic study of mountaintop removal coal mining in Appalachia. He has also created a documentary film on the subject.

  • 00:08:00 John Kress

    Are you still wondering what kind of tree that is in your back yard? Now a click of your smart phone can tell you. Smithsonian research botanist John Kress, together with engineers at Columbia University, has developed the Leafsnap app, an electronic field guide. Take a photo of a leaf, and the app can tell you what tree it comes from. Kress joins Boyd in the National Geographic courtyard to identify some trees.

  • This week David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, joins Boyd to talk about penguins in Antarctica doing the wave.

  • 00:11:00 Mitchell Zuckoff

    Set in 1945, Lost in Shangri-La is a book about three people who survive a plane crash in a remote region of Dutch New Guinea only to realize they are surrounded by man-eating headhunters and enemy Japanese soldiers. This amazing, true story of survival is told by author Mitchell Zuckoff, who joins Boyd to talk about his new book.

  • 00:09:00 Natalia Ledford

    National Geographic Young Explorer Natalia Ledford is trying to understand how Rwandan orphans are able to forgive those who killed their families during the genocide that occurred in that country. Ledford and co-director Emmanuel Habimana, a Rwandan orphan himself, are working on completing a film about this.

  • 00:06:00 Roger Hanlon

    National Geographic grantee Roger Hanlon is showing that cuttlefish may be better impersonators than Rich Little. Hanlon’s studies show cuttlefish are able to shape-shift in order to mimic their surroundings in nature and in an aquarium.

  • 00:08:00 Alexandra Fuller

    Namibia is one of the first countries to write environmental protection into its constitution. Now, nearly half of the African country’s landmass is devoted to national parks. Alexandra Fuller, author of the July National Geographic magazine article “Africa’s Super Park,” joins Boyd to talk about the article.