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Episode 1121—Air Date: May 21, 2011

This week on National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson speaks with guests about sailing from San Francisco to Sydney, Australia, on a boat that’s falling apart, spreading peace in the Middle East one tourist at a time, surfboards without fins, the mysterious world of squid, naked penguins, a family of chimpanzees in Canada, the social network of ants, a new ozone hole, the superorganism that is the human race, and packing for a night in Paris.

HOUR 1

• Filmmaker Max Jourdan says he didn’t know what he was getting into when he agreed to sail from San Francisco to Sydney, Australia, aboard David de Rothschild’s brainchild, the Plastiki—a boat built from 12,500 plastic bottles. Jourdan’s film, Voyage of the Plastiki, is showing at film festivals around the country and on the National Geographic Channel.

• 2011 National Geographic Emerging Explorer Aziz Abu Sarah lost his brother to the Israel-Palestine conflict, but instead of seeking revenge, he has spent the last ten years working as a peace activist. Abu Sarah joins Boyd in the studio to talk about his efforts to promote peace through Middle East tourism.

National Geographic Adventure’s gear guru, Steve Casimiro joins Boyd to talk about finless surfboards and tracking devices for your luggage.

• Author Wendy Williams speaks to Boyd about her new book Kraken: The Curious, Exciting, and Slightly Disturbing Science of Squid.

• This week David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, talks about naked penguins and floating rafts of ants.

HOUR 2

• In his new book The Chimps of Fauna Sanctuary, author Andrew Westoll shares the harrowing tale of a group of chimps rescued from a research lab and sent to a special sanctuary.

• Author, photographer, and scientist Mark Moffett loves ants—so much so that he’ll let them swarm all over his arms, neck, and face in order to take their picture. Despite the bites he endured, Moffett managed to capture astounding pictures for "Sisterhood of Weaver Ants," in the May issue of National Geographic magazine.

Bryan Johnson, a scientist at NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, joins Boyd to talk about the growing ozone hole over the Arctic.

Tim Flannery’s new book Here on Earth asks us all to reconsider what it means to be human. Boyd talks to Flannery about evolution and the superorganism that the interconnected human species is becoming.

• Despite all his travel, Boyd believes he’s actually getting worse at packing. That’s why he had to schedule a stop in Paris on his latest trip to Africa.

Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1121—Air Date: May 21, 2011

  • 00:11:00 Max Jourdan

    Filmmaker Max Jourdan says he didn’t know what he was getting into when he agreed to sail from San Francisco to Sydney, Australia, aboard David de Rothschild’s brainchild, the Plastiki—a boat built from 12,500 plastic bottles. Jourdan’s film, Voyage of the Plastiki, is showing at film festivals around the country and on the National Geographic Channel.

  • 00:09:00 Aziz Abu Sarah

    2011 National Geographic Emerging Explorer Aziz Abu Sarah lost his brother to the Israel-Palestine conflict, but instead of seeking revenge, he has spent the last ten years working as a peace activist. Abu Sarah joins Boyd in the studio to talk about his efforts to promote peace through Middle East tourism.

  • 00:06:00 Steve Casimiro

    National Geographic Adventure’s gear guru, Steve Casimiro joins Boyd to talk about finless surfboards and tracking devices for your luggage.

  • 00:08:00 Wendy Williams

    Author Wendy Williams speaks to Boyd about her new book Kraken: The Curious, Exciting, and Slightly Disturbing Science of Squid.

  • This week David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, talks about naked penguins and floating rafts of ants.

  • 00:11:00 Andrew Westoll

    In his new book The Chimps of Fauna Sanctuary, author Andrew Westoll shares the harrowing tale of a group of chimps rescued from a research lab and sent to a special sanctuary.

  • 00:09:00 Mark Moffett

    Author, photographer and scientist Mark Moffett loves ants—so much so that he’ll let them swarm all over his arms, neck, and face in order to take their picture. Despite the bites he endured, Moffett managed to capture astounding pictures for “Sisterhood of Weaver Ants,” in the May issue of National Geographic magazine.

  • 00:06:00 Bryan Johnson

    Bryan Johnson is a scientist at NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, and joins Boyd to talk about the growing ozone hole over the Arctic.

  • 00:08:00 Tim Flannery

    Tim Flannery’s new book Here on Earth asks us all to reconsider what it means to be human. Boyd talks to Flannery about evolution and the superorganism that the interconnected human species is becoming.

  • Despite all his travel, Boyd believes he’s actually getting worse at packing. That’s why he had to schedule a stop in Paris on his latest trip to Africa.