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Episode 1119—Air Date: May 7, 2011

This week on National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson speaks with guests about playing hide-and-seek with a jungle elephant, cooking with canned seafood, running with grunion on a beach in Southern California, prehistoric saber-toothed vegetarians, places where worlds collide, the roar of female elephants, digging up ancient trash in India, the best travel guides, and food poisoning in Africa.

HOUR 1

Richard Carroll, vice president of World Wildlife Fund’s Africa Program, joins Boyd in the studio to talk about the 17 years he spent living alongside pygmies in the African bush, including times when he was chased by forest elephants and charged by gorillas.

• Yes you can—with the can! Chef and National Geographic Fellow, Barton Seaver, joins Boyd to talk about canned seafood. It can be sustainable and tasty, according to Seaver, who shares an easy canned-seafood recipe.

• National Geographic grantee Karen Martin often finds herself on the Southern California coast strolling along a moonlit beach. But Martin is not alone—she is joined by thousands of tiny fish, called grunions, that come ashore twice a month to spawn. Martin talks with Boyd about the strange sight of the grunion run.

• This week, David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, shares the story of a 260-million-year-old saber-toothed vegetarian animal.

HOUR 2

National Geographic magazine contributor Eugene Linden authored a new book titled, The Ragged Edge of the World: Encounters at the Frontier Where Modernity, Wildlands, and Indigenous Peoples Meet. Linden and Boyd discuss how indigenous cultures—like those in New Guinea—are adapting to globalization.

• A female elephant has a limited time frame for mating: only four days every four years. As a result, female elephants will raise their voice to ensure that they are heard by faraway males, according to Michael Garstang, a former professor of environmental sciences at the University of Virginia. A female elephant in heat can be as loud as a jackhammer or rock concert, says Garstang.

• National Geographic grantee and archaeologist Monica Smith is digging up 2,500-year-old garbage in India. She talks with Boyd about her adventures in the field and shares her optimism that ancient Indian cities survived their own economic hardships.

National Geographic Traveler senior editor Norie Quintos joins Boyd to talk about the "Tours of a Lifetime" article in the May/June issue of the magazine. Quintos and Boyd talk about why a knowledgeable and friendly travel guide can make a good trip even better.

• National Geographic Fellow, chef Barton Seaver, may sing the praise of canned seafood, but, for Boyd, the idea brings back memories of food poisoning in Africa.

Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1119—Air Date: May 7, 2011

  • 00:09:00 Michael Garstang

    A female elephant has a limited time frame for mating: only four days every four years. As a result, female elephants will raise their voice to ensure that they are heard by far-away males, according to Michael Garstang, a former professor of environmental sciences at the University of Virginia. A female elephant in heat can be as loud as a jackhammer or rock concert, says Garstang.

  • 00:06:00 Monica Smith

    National Geographic grantee and archaeologist Monica Smith is digging up 2,500-year-old garbage in India. She talks with Boyd about her adventures in the field and shares her optimism that ancient Indian cities survived their own economic hardships.

  • 00:08:00 Nori Quintos

    National Geographic Traveler senior editor Norie Quintos joins Boyd to talk about the “Tours of a Lifetime” article in the May/June issue of the magazine. Quintos and Boyd talk about why a knowledgeable and friendly travel guide can make a good trip even better.

  • National Geographic Fellow, chef Barton Seaver, may sing the praise of canned seafood, but, for Boyd, the idea brings back memories of food poisoning in Africa.

  • 00:11:00 Richard Carroll

    Richard Carroll, vice president of World Wildlife Fund’s Africa Program, joins Boyd in the studio to talk about the 17 years he spent living alongside pygmies in the African bush, including times when he was chased by forest elephants and charged by gorillas.

  • 00:06:00 Barton Seaver

    Yes you can—with the can! Chef and National Geographic Fellow Barton Seaver joins Boyd to talk about canned seafood. It can be sustainable and tasty, according to Seaver, who shares an easy canned seafood recipe.

  • 00:08:00 Karen Martin

    National Geographic grantee Karen Martin often finds herself on the Southern California coast strolling along a moonlit beach. But Martin is not alone—she is joined by thousands of tiny fish, called grunions, that come ashore twice a month to spawn. Martin talks with Boyd about the strange sight of the grunion run.

  • This week, David Braun, editor of National Geographic Daily News, shares the story of a 260-million-year-old saber-toothed vegetarian animal.

  • 00:11:00 Eugene Linden

    National Geographic magazine contributor Eugene Linden authored a new book titled, The Ragged Edge of the World: Encounters at the Frontier Where Modernity, Wildlands, and Indigenous Peoples Meet. Linden and Boyd discuss how indigenous cultures—like those in New Guinea—are adapting to globalization.