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Episode 1112—Air Date: March 19, 2011

This week on National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson speaks with guests about trekking through the deserts of Tanzania, finding our prehistoric ancestors, NASA’s mission to Mercury, why a poke in the eye signifies friendship to a monkey, making antimatter from gold, switching careers from a musician to photographer, identifying birds in your backyard, an avalanche airbag, spotting the extremely rare Javan rhino, and climbing the Khumbu Icefall on Mount Everest.

HOUR 1

• Primatologist and host of Nat Geo WILD! Mireya Mayor recently published a book on her journey from NFL cheerleader to National Geographic Explorer. She joins Boyd in the studio to talk about one of her most challenging adventures: an expedition across Tanzania to trace Sir Henry Morton Stanley’s route in search of David Livingstone—a journey which was documented by the History Channel in Expedition Africa. (See the Book at Amazon)

• National Geographic Grantee and Chair of Vertebrate Paleontology at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History Chris Beard joins Boyd to talk about his latest study on the origin of mankind in Africa. (PhysOrg.com).

Victoria Jaggard, National Geographic news editor and space blogger, discusses NASA’s mission to conduct the first orbital study of Mercury, the planet nearest to the Sun. (NASA Web Site)

• National Geographic Grantee Susan Perry, who works in the Department of Anthropology in UCLA, joins Boyd to talk about monkey play. Perry tells Boyd about the fascinating, but strange ways capuchin monkeys display love and loyalty to one another—including eye poking and nose picking. (UCLA Anthropology Web Site)

• National Geographic's daily online news editor David Braun shares some of the week’s hottest stories, including making antimatter from gold! (National Geographic News)

HOUR 2

• Most of Melissa Auf der Maur's fans know her as the bassist for the rock groups Hole and The Smashing Pumpkins. But Auf der Maur is also an avid photographer. She joins Boyd to talk about her new multimedia concept project, “Out of Our Minds,” and preview her upcoming talk on April 8 in Washington, D.C, as part of the National Geographic Live! “Music on...Photography” series. (National Geographic Events)

• Is that a blue jay or a scrub jay? National Geographic bird expert and illustrator Jonathan Alderfer has a new book out to help you identify all the birds on your bird feeder. Aldefer joins Boyd in the studio to talk about his book, National Geographic Backyard Guide to the Birds of North America. (Get the Book at the Nat Geo Store)

Steve Casimiro, the “gear guru,” joins Boyd to talk about some of the latest and greatest gadgets for outdoor adventures, including avalanche packs, an all-electric motorcycle and a new helmet camera. (Steve Casimiro's Blog)

• There are only 40 Javan rhinos left in Indonesia, the only place in which the species now exists. Barry Long of the World Wildlife Fund talks about the Hope for Javan Rhinos program, a recovery project working to save this critically endangered species. (WWF—Javan Rhinos Web Site)

Boyd shares a harrowing experience crossing the Khumbu Icefall on Mount Everest.

Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1112—Air Date: March 19, 2011

  • 00:11:00 Mireya Mayor

    Primatologist and host of Nat Geo WILD! Mireya Mayor recently published "Pink Boots and a Machete," a book on her journey from NFL cheerleader to National Geographic Explorer. She joins Boyd in the studio to talk about one of her most challenging adventures: an expedition across Tanzania to trace Sir Henry Morton Stanley’s route in search of David Livingstone–a journey which was documented by the History Channel in “Expedition Africa.”

  • 00:09:00 Chris Beard

    National Geographic Grantee and Chair of Vertebrate Paleontology at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History Chris Beard joins Boyd to talk about his latest study on the origin of mankind in Africa.

  • 00:06:00 Victoria Jaggard

    Victoria Jaggard, National Geographic news editor and space blogger, discusses NASA’s mission to conduct the first orbital study of Mercury, the planet nearest to the Sun.

  • 00:08:00 Susan Perry

    National Geographic Grantee Susan Perry, who works in the Department of Anthropology in UCLA, joins Boyd to talk about monkey play. Perry tells Boyd about the fascinating, but strange ways capuchin monkeys display love and loyalty to one another–including eye poking and nose picking.

  • National Geographic's daily online news editor David Braun shares some of the week’s hottest stories, including making antimatter from gold!

  • Most of Melissa Auf der Maur's fans know her as the bassist for the rock groups Hole and The Smashing Pumpkins. But Auf der Maur is also an avid photographer. She joins Boyd to talk about her new multimedia concept project, “Out of Our Minds,” and preview her upcoming talk on April 8 in Washington, D.C, as part of the National Geographic Live! “Music on Photography” series.

  • Is that a blue jay or a scrub jay? National Geographic bird expert and illustrator Jonathan Alderfer has a new book out to help you identify all the birds on your bird feeder. Aldefer joins Boyd in the studio to talk about his book, “National Geographic Backyard Guide to the Birds of North America.”

  • 00:06:00 Steve Casimiro

    Steve Casimiro, the “gear guru,” joins Boyd to talk about some of the latest and greatest gadgets for outdoor adventures, including avalanche packs, an all-electric motorcycle and a new helmet camera.

  • 00:08:00 Barry Long

    There are only 40 Javan rhinos left in Indonesia, the only place in which the species now exists. Barry Long of the World Wildlife Fund talks about the Hope for Javan Rhinos program, a recovery project working to save this critically endangered species.

  • Boyd shares a harrowing experience crossing the Khumbu Icefall on Mount Everest.