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Episode 1109—Air Date: February 26, 2011

This week on National Geographic Weekend host Boyd Matson speaks with guests about finding a whale of a shipwreck, living with king cobras in India, traveling the world on an empty stomach, conquering the South Pole at age 79, potty training a bat, photographing a whale in mid-air, taming wild animals, eating snakes in Hong Kong, rediscovering an endangered bird in Syria, and running out of toilet paper in Morocco.

HOUR 1

Kelly Gleason recently discovered a shipwreck with ties to the famed novel Moby Dick. Gleason, a maritime archaeologist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and maritime heritage coordinator at the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument, shares the intriguing tale behind the Two Brothers shipwreck. (National Geographic News)

• Herpetologist Romulus Whitaker loves snakes and is working to make sure others love them too. Whitaker founded the Agumbe Rainforest Research Station in Karnataka, India for the study of king cobras and their habitat. The king cobra is the world’s longest venomous snake, and, according to Whitaker, it needs our protection.

Elyse Pasquale spent the past year traveling the world in search of interesting meals—a journey that she documented on her blog FoodieInternational.com. Pasquale joins Boyd to talk about some of the more unusual cuisines she’s tried, from fried scorpions to raw sea cucumbers. (Elyse Pasquale's Blog)

• At age 79, Barbara Hillary recently became the first African American woman to set foot on both the North and South Poles. She joins Boyd to talk about her achievement. (Barbara Hillary's Website)

• National Geographic's daily online news editor David Braun shares some of the week’s hottest stories, including how to potty train a bat. (National Geographic News)

HOUR 2

• When photographer Michael Melford went on assignment for National Geographic in Alaska, he shot thousands of photos, but only 10 images were published in the magazine. In his new book, Hidden Alaska: Bristol Bay and Beyond, Melford shares the many unseen photos from his trip. (See Photos)

• Why are some animals man’s best friend, while others just can’t be domesticated? The answer is found in their genes, writes Evan Ratliff in "Taming the Wild,” an article in the March issue of National Geographic magazine. (Read the Article)

• Photographer Catherine Karnow grew up in Hong Kong and recently returned to her hometown to shoot photos for the article “Ghosts of Hong Kong,” published in the March issue of National Geographic Traveler. (Karnow's Photos)

• For 70 years, the northern bald ibis was believed extinct in Syria until National Geographic grantee Gianluca Serra found seven of these birds living in the desert. Serra talks with Boyd about his discovery and his hopes to bring the endangered species back from the brink of extinction. (Gianluca Serra's Web Site)

• Boyd explains why it’s not always the exotic meals that surprise us; that even the most innocuous food can lead to unexpected consequences.

Listen to National Geographic Weekend

Episode 1109—Air Date: February 26, 2011

  • 00:11:00 Kelly Gleason

    Kelly Gleason recently discovered a shipwreck with ties to the famed novel “Moby Dick.” Gleason, a maritime archaeologist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and maritime heritage coordinator at the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument, shares the intriguing tale behind the Two Brothers shipwreck.

  • 00:09:00 Romulus Whitaker

    Herpetologist Romulus Whitaker loves snakes and is working to make sure others love them too. Whitaker founded the Agumbe Rainforest Research Station in Karnataka, India for the study of king cobras and their habitat. The king cobra is the world’s longest venomous snake, and, according to Whitaker, it needs our protection.

  • 00:06:00 Elyse Pasquale

    Elyse Pasquale spent the past year traveling the world in search of interesting meals—a journey that she documented on her blog FoodieInternational.com. Pasquale joins Boyd to talk about some of the more unusual cuisines she’s tried, from fried scorpions to raw sea cucumbers.

  • 00:08:00 Barbara Hillary

    At age 79, Barbara Hillary recently became the first African American woman to set foot on both the North and South Poles. She joins Boyd to talk about her achievement.

  • National Geographic's daily online news editor David Braun shares some of the week’s hottest stories, including how to potty train a bat.

  • 00:11:00 Michael Melford

    When photographer Michael Melford went on assignment for National Geographic in Alaska, he shot thousands of photos, but only 10 images were published in the magazine. In his new book, “Hidden Alaska: Bristol Bay and Beyond,” Melford shares the many unseen photos from his trip.

  • 00:09:00 Evan Ratliff

    Why are some animals man’s best friend, while others just can’t be domesticated? The answer is found in their genes, writes Evan Ratliff in “Taming the Wild,” an article in the March issue of National Geographic magazine.

  • Photographer Catherine Karnow grew up in Hong Kong and recently returned to her hometown to shoot photos for the article “Ghosts of Hong Kong,” published in the March issue of National Geographic Traveler.

  • 00:08:00 Gianluca Serra

    For 70 years, the northern bald ibis was believed extinct in Syria until National Geographic grantee Gianluca Serra found seven of these birds living in the desert. Serra talks with Boyd about his discovery and his hopes to bring the endangered species back from the brink of extinction.

  • Boyd explains why it’s not always the exotic meals that surprise us; that even the most innocuous food can lead to unexpected consequences.